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ACUCW1 or ACUCW2 - Which Course is Right for You?

Video | July 21, 2011

Global Knowledge Course Director and Lab Topology Architect Joey DeWiele, a specialist in Unified Communications, explains the difference between our Cisco Unified Communications courses - ACUCW1 & ACUCW2.

Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)

Article | Aug. 28, 2009

When sending data end-to-end through a network, routers are used in internetworking to create a virtual network from one device to another, either locally or globally. Routers are configured to operate with most common network protocols. That means they know the form...

Advanced Routing Tips and Tricks: Router Path Selection Modification and Optimization with EIGRP and OSPF

Webinar – Recorded | Jan. 19, 2016

This hour-long, information-packed webinar will provide tips and tricks for modifying and optimizing router path selection with EIGRP and OSPF. You will learn about EIGRP redistribution, including redistributing static routes into EIGRP, and about OSPF redistribution. You'll learn about using route maps and prefix lists and about summarization with EIGRP and OSPF. Also, you will receive tips for controlling updates and path selection.

A Guide to Network Time Protocol (NTP)

Article | May 03, 2017

What is Network Time Protocol (NTP)? Well, it’s a network protocol used to synchronize clocks between computing systems over a packet switched network. It’s been around since the mid-1980s and was developed by David Mills at the University of Delaware; it is one of the oldest protocols still around on the Internet. NTP replaced other time synchronization technologies that didn’t have some capabilities to adjust time based on location of the time source or time server relative to the receiver or adjusting to the variation of delay found on typical data networks.

Allow or Disallow All IPSec Traffic through the Firewall?

Article | June 02, 2010

The subject of this week’s post was actually prompted by a question from a former colleague.  Soon after the PIX Firewall added support for IPSec Virtual Private Networks, a command was added to the command-line, sysopt connection permit-ipsec. This command was subse...

AnyConnect Syslog Troubleshooting

Article | Feb. 15, 2010

I recently was presented with the challenge of logging ALL of the pertinent connection, disconnection, and termination messages associated with the Cisco SSL AnyConnect client without overwhelming the syslog capture display with extraneous messages. This blog will br...

ASA Service Policies with Priority and Policing

Article | Nov. 03, 2010

As is sometimes the case, the idea for this article originated with a student question I received during one of the Securing Networks with ASA Fundamentals classes I have taught this summer. The course material mentions a simple scenario whereby IP Telephony traffic...

ASDM Demo Mode Tour

Article | Nov. 17, 2010

As is frequently the case these days, I get a brainstorm for an article during a Cisco Security training class I conduct. This summer I taught the Securing Networks with ASA Fundamentals class, which concentrates heavily on the Adaptive Security Device Manager (ASDM)...

Basics of Understanding RIP

Article | July 30, 2009

RIP is a protocol that is used for routing IP networks. It was designed in the early 1980’s for communication between gateways (computers with two NIC’s). It is the oldest routing protocol used by the network industry and is considered by many to be inefficient or bo...

Benefit from Using Failover MAC Address

Article | Nov. 04, 2011

In this post I’ll focus on a topic that’s mentioned in the Cisco FIREWALL training class but isn’t emphasized there or in the online Cisco ASA documentation. When configuring failover on a pair of ASA security appliances, a situation can arise in which network disruption occurs due to the secondary ASA in a failover pair becoming active first and then the primary comes online second. Both the documentation and the courseware point out that this causes the secondary (and active ASA) to swap its interface MAC addresses with those of the primary. Being naturally skeptical about this behavior, I decided to investigate. The rest of this post illustrates my confirmation of this phenomenon.